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Author Topic: Le Vent Du Nord  (Read 12509 times)
Adam
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« on: August 10, 2018, 06:14:14 PM »

C’est magnifique! Wasn’t sure what to expect, but loved them for the energy. My festival favourite so far...
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« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2018, 07:14:29 PM »


C’est magnifique! Wasn’t sure what to expect, but loved them for the energy. My festival favourite so far...
Me too. Joyous and uplifting and, like many bands I see at Cropredy, genuinely happy to be here. Loved them  Cheesy
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« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2018, 11:33:27 PM »

Second time I’ve seen them and thought they were brilliant. Long time since the signing queue has been that long so clearly went down a storm.
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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2018, 08:57:24 AM »

I thought they were great, despite not understanding a word of what they sang.
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« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2018, 01:57:36 PM »

Third time seeing them, and that was the same level of excellence as before. Superb.

Genticorum play similarly and would be another great booking. If they are still going.
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« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2018, 03:26:19 PM »

Sorry guys left me a bit nonplussed I’m afraid
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« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2018, 08:07:03 PM »

The guy tapping his feet throughout the set drove me crazy
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« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2018, 08:14:49 PM »


The guy tapping his feet throughout the set drove me crazy



That's the whole point of the genre, if it's not your thing then just accept it and do something else.
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« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2018, 08:56:30 PM »

We didn't appreciate them as fully as others seem to have.
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« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2018, 09:49:24 PM »



The guy tapping his feet throughout the set drove me crazy



That's the whole point of the genre, if it's not your thing then just accept it and do something else.


??!!
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« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2018, 10:51:20 PM »

I thought they were wonderful for me really one of the highlights of the festival.
Others must have thought so, too for when I went to buy CDs of them almost everybody else in there bought one, too
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« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2018, 10:54:43 PM »




The guy tapping his feet throughout the set drove me crazy



That's the whole point of the genre, if it's not your thing then just accept it and do something else.


??!!


Le Vent Du Nord is a band dedicated to preserving and sharing the musical heritage of francophone Canada: Le Vent du Nord (literally, "wind from the north"). All four of the band's musicians come from musical families, sing and have mastered such instruments as guitar, mandolin, fiddle, piano, accordion, acoustic bass, hurdy-gurdy and foot-tapping board. The group's new CD, Dans les airs, features songs — some more than 400 years old — from Quebec and Acadia, the name given to certain areas along the northeastern coast of America.

Because some of the songs they perform arrived on these shores with early French settlers and date back even more than 400 years, the group is sort of a collector of musical "antiques," preserving and introducing unusual material that has not yet been discovered or recorded, says hurdy-gurdy player Nicolas Boulerice.

"A lot of people call us guardians of the tradition," Boulerice says. "The old people want to know if you are respectful, if you sing those songs in the way of the tradition."

"We don't change the melody or lyrics much, or even the way the old people were playing it — this is its magic," adds fiddler Olivier Demers. "We want to keep the real soul of the fiddle tune." Demers also likes to point out that a lot of this music is not solely French, but a unique blend of French, Irish and Native American influences, with occasional flavoring from the U.S.

The band looks for antique musical gems wherever they go. When they heard about a "very good singer" living in the farming village of St. Guillaume, a short distance from Montreal, they knocked on the nearly 90-year-old singer's door, introduced themselves as musicians, and spent the evening in the kitchen — drinking, singing, and learning some of the precious old songs, such as "La beauté du mariage."

Traditional Quebecois percussion consists of foot-tapping on a special board. Le Vent du Nord's foot-tapper, Demers, explains that it originated in their ancestors' farmhouse kitchens. Saturday evenings were a highlight for the families, many of which had 15 to 20 children.

"Probably there was one fiddle player in every village. Sometimes they put the fiddler on a chair, and put the chair on a table in the middle of the kitchen, because it was the largest room in the house. People would dance around the table while the fiddler played and tapped his feet to keep time for dancing."

Some French songs survive in Canada long after they have been forgotten in France, such as "La fille et les dragons," a song about a young woman who leaves home to live with three dragons (a "dragon" here is not the mythical beast, but a knight or soldier). When her parents come looking for her she tells them, "one brushes my hair, the other one cleans my house, and I'm sitting on the knee of the third one. I'm very happy and don't want to return [home]."

In this song you can hear a kind of French Canadian "scat" singing — called turlutte, in imitation of the flute, which was very popular. It's also called "mouth music," or "mouth reel," and is found in the Celtic tradition as well.

"It's also a way to express joy without anything [without an instrument], and everyone can do it," says Demers. "At that time, with not enough to eat and big families for working in the fields, the early settlers had a hard life. But they had their passion and their joy and the desire to survive. Without any fiddle, without anything, they got together to make this beautiful place called Quebec." And this beautiful music that has survived.

But unfortunately it drives you crazy?

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« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2018, 10:56:27 PM »

Lively, vibrant, pulsating and life-affirming. Brilliant stuff IMHO
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« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2018, 12:41:56 PM »


Lively, vibrant, pulsating and life-affirming. Brilliant stuff IMHO


Couldn't have put it better myself Stephen. Loved them!
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« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2018, 08:01:30 PM »

A highlight for me. Loved there enthusiasm and musical skill. They represent the wonderful diversity that I expect at Cropredy.
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« Reply #15 on: August 13, 2018, 09:46:15 PM »

Loved them, bought their CDs as they were playing, just so uplifting...

Will always remind me of an hour or two of warmth and sunshine on a Friday afternoon in a field!
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« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2018, 09:56:46 PM »

Yes, one of the highlights for me...thought they were brilliant.  So good, I bought one of their CD’s!
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« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2018, 10:00:30 PM »

I've seen them a couple of times before and they were as good as I remembered - played with passion, humour and talent (and a good range of instruments  don't think I saw any other hurdy gurdys, and certainly no foot tapping boards)
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« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2018, 09:06:14 PM »

They were another of my highlights - I had heard of them, and a few tunes on the radio, but they exceeded my expectations.  Another band that left me with a huge smile on my face.  
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Nick Reg
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« Reply #19 on: August 14, 2018, 10:19:39 PM »





The guy tapping his feet throughout the set drove me crazy



That's the whole point of the genre, if it's not your thing then just accept it and do something else.


??!!


Le Vent Du Nord is a band dedicated to preserving and sharing the musical heritage of francophone Canada: Le Vent du Nord (literally, "wind from the north"). All four of the band's musicians come from musical families, sing and have mastered such instruments as guitar, mandolin, fiddle, piano, accordion, acoustic bass, hurdy-gurdy and foot-tapping board. The group's new CD, Dans les airs, features songs — some more than 400 years old — from Quebec and Acadia, the name given to certain areas along the northeastern coast of America.

Because some of the songs they perform arrived on these shores with early French settlers and date back even more than 400 years, the group is sort of a collector of musical "antiques," preserving and introducing unusual material that has not yet been discovered or recorded, says hurdy-gurdy player Nicolas Boulerice.

"A lot of people call us guardians of the tradition," Boulerice says. "The old people want to know if you are respectful, if you sing those songs in the way of the tradition."

"We don't change the melody or lyrics much, or even the way the old people were playing it — this is its magic," adds fiddler Olivier Demers. "We want to keep the real soul of the fiddle tune." Demers also likes to point out that a lot of this music is not solely French, but a unique blend of French, Irish and Native American influences, with occasional flavoring from the U.S.

The band looks for antique musical gems wherever they go. When they heard about a "very good singer" living in the farming village of St. Guillaume, a short distance from Montreal, they knocked on the nearly 90-year-old singer's door, introduced themselves as musicians, and spent the evening in the kitchen — drinking, singing, and learning some of the precious old songs, such as "La beauté du mariage."

Traditional Quebecois percussion consists of foot-tapping on a special board. Le Vent du Nord's foot-tapper, Demers, explains that it originated in their ancestors' farmhouse kitchens. Saturday evenings were a highlight for the families, many of which had 15 to 20 children.

"Probably there was one fiddle player in every village. Sometimes they put the fiddler on a chair, and put the chair on a table in the middle of the kitchen, because it was the largest room in the house. People would dance around the table while the fiddler played and tapped his feet to keep time for dancing."

Some French songs survive in Canada long after they have been forgotten in France, such as "La fille et les dragons," a song about a young woman who leaves home to live with three dragons (a "dragon" here is not the mythical beast, but a knight or soldier). When her parents come looking for her she tells them, "one brushes my hair, the other one cleans my house, and I'm sitting on the knee of the third one. I'm very happy and don't want to return [home]."

In this song you can hear a kind of French Canadian "scat" singing — called turlutte, in imitation of the flute, which was very popular. It's also called "mouth music," or "mouth reel," and is found in the Celtic tradition as well.

"It's also a way to express joy without anything [without an instrument], and everyone can do it," says Demers. "At that time, with not enough to eat and big families for working in the fields, the early settlers had a hard life. But they had their passion and their joy and the desire to survive. Without any fiddle, without anything, they got together to make this beautiful place called Quebec." And this beautiful music that has survived.

But unfortunately it drives you crazy?




One of my sons is a drummer and he's forever tapping and driving me crazy for years. No need to turn it into Pseuds Corner.!
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