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Author Topic: Listening to.......  (Read 203764 times)
Alan2
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« Reply #1280 on: February 13, 2024, 09:04:19 AM »

Tanita Tikaram  :  Closer to the People (ear LP, 2016).

This is still her  most recent album. Word has it she will be recording something new this year.
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« Reply #1281 on: February 14, 2024, 11:00:39 AM »


The new Decemberists single 'Burial Ground'. Very strong 60s West Coast sound - a bit different for them, but I like it. The final couplet is pure Colin Meloy.


I just discovered it earlier this morning and got a nice warm glow listening to it
It got a strong "Oil give it foive" from the cumbrian  jury
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« Reply #1282 on: February 14, 2024, 11:17:38 AM »



The new Decemberists single 'Burial Ground'. Very strong 60s West Coast sound - a bit different for them, but I like it. The final couplet is pure Colin Meloy.


I just discovered it earlier this morning and got a nice warm glow listening to it
It got a strong "Oil give it foive" from the cumbrian  jury


Depends what it's out of Wink Well, this Cumbrian jury was a little shocked on first listen but I'm liking it a lot now...
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« Reply #1283 on: February 19, 2024, 08:46:23 AM »

Fire  :  The Magic Shoemaker  ( Esoteric CD, 2009).

I have this because of the Strawbs connection.   It's a quaint piece of psychedelia from 1968.
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« Reply #1284 on: February 19, 2024, 08:35:07 PM »



The new Decemberists single 'Burial Ground'. Very strong 60s West Coast sound - a bit different for them, but I like it. The final couplet is pure Colin Meloy.


I just discovered it earlier this morning and got a nice warm glow listening to it
It got a strong "Oil give it foive" from the cumbrian  jury


Seconded by me… lovely song. Colin played a solo set on Instagram a couple of nights ago, and another new song (The Reapers) sounded great!
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« Reply #1285 on: February 19, 2024, 09:04:43 PM »

Willie The Pimp from Hot Rats. Captain Beefheart's vocals are brilliant.
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« Reply #1286 on: February 20, 2024, 08:34:43 PM »

Alan Doyle's latest-Welcome Home. Solid, if rather short (9 song collection). It is quieter than his other albums, with only two real footstompers. But if on paper that sounds like a disappointment it is not. The balance is wonderfully written, both introspective and tender. Live he does a lot of the old Great Big Sea material, but this is interesting in that there are two nods to GBS. The first is a reworking of 'How Did We Get From Saying I Love You (Till I'll See You Around Someday) which appeared on GBS' album Play in 1997. The second is the closer 'All For A Song'. It is very much about Great Big Sea's early days-taking the ferry from Newfoundland to Halifax, Nova Scotia, getting lost in Boston, singing until their voices hurt, but wanting to continue because 'Lukey was making them clap'. The chorus continues with it being about the music, not the wine and whisky, not about getting recognized in their hometown newspaper, and all that sort of thing. I can't help thinking it is about his relationship with Sean McCann in particular. They always seemed close, and once Sean left for well-documented reasons which caused the end of Great Big Sea the relationship was cordial but obviously strained. So, I sort of wonder if this is Alan's release of his own narrative of that time. Regardless I have played the album a few times now and it is definitely a nice addition to his catalog.
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« Reply #1287 on: February 20, 2024, 08:44:18 PM »


Alan Doyle's latest-Welcome Home. Solid, if rather short (9 song collection). It is quieter than his other albums, with only two real footstompers. But if on paper that sounds like a disappointment it is not. The balance is wonderfully written, both introspective and tender. Live he does a lot of the old Great Big Sea material, but this is interesting in that there are two nods to GBS. The first is a reworking of 'How Did We Get From Saying I Love You (Till I'll See You Around Someday) which appeared on GBS' album Play in 1997. The second is the closer 'All For A Song'. It is very much about Great Big Sea's early days-taking the ferry from Newfoundland to Halifax, Nova Scotia, getting lost in Boston, singing until their voices hurt, but wanting to continue because 'Lukey was making them clap'. The chorus continues with it being about the music, not the wine and whisky, not about getting recognized in their hometown newspaper, and all that sort of thing. I can't help thinking it is about his relationship with Sean McCann in particular. They always seemed close, and once Sean left for well-documented reasons which caused the end of Great Big Sea the relationship was cordial but obviously strained. So, I sort of wonder if this is Alan's release of his own narrative of that time. Regardless I have played the album a few times now and it is definitely a nice addition to his catalog.


Thanks for the tip off Robert. I have been having a bit of a GBS session lately. I miss them and deeply regret never having seen them live. I keep meaning to explore Alan's solo stuff. I must get started on that.
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« Reply #1288 on: February 20, 2024, 08:54:52 PM »



Alan Doyle's latest-Welcome Home. Solid, if rather short (9 song collection). It is quieter than his other albums, with only two real footstompers. But if on paper that sounds like a disappointment it is not. The balance is wonderfully written, both introspective and tender. Live he does a lot of the old Great Big Sea material, but this is interesting in that there are two nods to GBS. The first is a reworking of 'How Did We Get From Saying I Love You (Till I'll See You Around Someday) which appeared on GBS' album Play in 1997. The second is the closer 'All For A Song'. It is very much about Great Big Sea's early days-taking the ferry from Newfoundland to Halifax, Nova Scotia, getting lost in Boston, singing until their voices hurt, but wanting to continue because 'Lukey was making them clap'. The chorus continues with it being about the music, not the wine and whisky, not about getting recognized in their hometown newspaper, and all that sort of thing. I can't help thinking it is about his relationship with Sean McCann in particular. They always seemed close, and once Sean left for well-documented reasons which caused the end of Great Big Sea the relationship was cordial but obviously strained. So, I sort of wonder if this is Alan's release of his own narrative of that time. Regardless I have played the album a few times now and it is definitely a nice addition to his catalog.


Thanks for the tip off Robert. I have been having a bit of a GBS session lately. I miss them and deeply regret never having seen them live. I keep meaning to explore Alan's solo stuff. I must get started on that.


My pleasure! I regularly return to GBS, though I stepped away from them for some time after the split. Alan’s first 3 solo albums are good in their own right, but I might actually start with his excellent Back To The Harbour EP. It is exquisite, and I think pointed towards a direction for the new album
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« Reply #1289 on: February 21, 2024, 01:31:53 PM »


Alan Doyle's latest-Welcome Home. Solid, if rather short (9 song collection). It is quieter than his other albums, with only two real footstompers. But if on paper that sounds like a disappointment it is not. The balance is wonderfully written, both introspective and tender. Live he does a lot of the old Great Big Sea material, but this is interesting in that there are two nods to GBS. The first is a reworking of 'How Did We Get From Saying I Love You (Till I'll See You Around Someday) which appeared on GBS' album Play in 1997. The second is the closer 'All For A Song'. It is very much about Great Big Sea's early days-taking the ferry from Newfoundland to Halifax, Nova Scotia, getting lost in Boston, singing until their voices hurt, but wanting to continue because 'Lukey was making them clap'. The chorus continues with it being about the music, not the wine and whisky, not about getting recognized in their hometown newspaper, and all that sort of thing. I can't help thinking it is about his relationship with Sean McCann in particular. They always seemed close, and once Sean left for well-documented reasons which caused the end of Great Big Sea the relationship was cordial but obviously strained. So, I sort of wonder if this is Alan's release of his own narrative of that time. Regardless I have played the album a few times now and it is definitely a nice addition to his catalog.


Didn't know this was coming. What a nice surprise! I've enjoyed all Alan's solo work so far (my favourite being A Week In The Warehouse) and, of course, I still regularly listen to Great Big Sea who are one of my favourite bands. I was lucky enough to catch them live, back in the late Nineties, in the heaving upstairs of a South London pub, with waht felt like the entire population of St Johns in attendance. Outstanding evening.
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« Reply #1290 on: February 23, 2024, 12:31:18 PM »

Surprised to find the whole of the 1985 Waterboys box is up in all the usual places for streaming.  I've been prevaricating thinking that it is far too much of a good thing, and it really is, but it is also thrilling and exciting and sexy like all good music should be.  I much prefer what was to come but this was rather special too... I could still be persuaded.

Oh, and one of our own played a significant part in putting it all together.  
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« Reply #1291 on: February 23, 2024, 03:05:52 PM »


Surprised to find the whole of the 1985 Waterboys box is up in all the usual places for streaming.  I've been prevaricating thinking that it is far too much of a good thing, and it really is, but it is also thrilling and exciting and sexy like all good music should be.  I much prefer what was to come but this was rather special too... I could still be persuaded.

Oh, and one of our own played a significant part in putting it all together.  
Looking forward to hearing this,I have the previous two boxes, which were considerably cheaper,and they are great.
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« Reply #1292 on: February 23, 2024, 03:09:21 PM »

Trevor Beales :  Fireside Stories- Hebden Bridge 1971-74.  (Basin Rock LP,  2022).


Very enjoyable (to me) recording with a fascinating  background story.
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« Reply #1293 on: February 28, 2024, 10:07:17 AM »

Incredible String Band  :  No Ruinous Feud  (US  Reprise  LP, 1973).

This album doesn't get a lot of love among ISB  fans,  but i rather like its quirkiness.
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« Reply #1294 on: February 28, 2024, 01:50:50 PM »


Incredible String Band  :  No Ruinous Feud  (US  Reprise  LP, 1973).

This album doesn't get a lot of love among ISB  fans,  but i rather like its quirkiness.


Well, there's a body of String Band fans who happily dismiss everything but the first four (and sometimes only 2-4)!  But the more sensible amongst us find something in all the albums...

I've spent a long time listening to the last three albums recently...and all of them are much much better than their reputation would suggest.  
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« Reply #1295 on: February 28, 2024, 08:43:26 PM »

Oysterband live in Worcester right now... We've revisited the 1980s, after the break, it's the 90s. Sadly, I can't get to the 2000s night tomorrow.
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« Reply #1296 on: February 28, 2024, 11:00:13 PM »

And the second half was just great!
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« Reply #1297 on: February 29, 2024, 08:27:35 AM »



Incredible String Band  :  No Ruinous Feud  (US  Reprise  LP, 1973).

This album doesn't get a lot of love among ISB  fans,  but i rather like its quirkiness.


Well, there's a body of String Band fans who happily dismiss everything but the first four (and sometimes only 2-4)!  But the more sensible amongst us find something in all the albums...

I've spent a long time listening to the last three albums recently...and all of them are much much better than their reputation would suggest.  


Absolutely.   I love all of their  albums whilst recognising there are 2 eras, and the transition to Island was a watershed. I listened to Earthspan last night and was as drawn into it and enthralled as I've ever been.
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« Reply #1298 on: March 01, 2024, 09:58:28 AM »

Big Big Train The Likes Of Us - the new album on release day (though my pre-order arrived yesterday, so this is actually the second listen).  It's wonderful - another development in the BBT story, as the first album with the new line-up.  A couple of long form tracks, and a nice handful of shorter ones.  Wonderful melodic prog.  Can't wait to see them at Cropredy!  Recommended to the house.
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« Reply #1299 on: March 01, 2024, 10:09:22 AM »




Incredible String Band  :  No Ruinous Feud  (US  Reprise  LP, 1973).

This album doesn't get a lot of love among ISB  fans,  but i rather like its quirkiness.


Well, there's a body of String Band fans who happily dismiss everything but the first four (and sometimes only 2-4)!  But the more sensible amongst us find something in all the albums...

I've spent a long time listening to the last three albums recently...and all of them are much much better than their reputation would suggest.  


Absolutely.   I love all of their  albums whilst recognising there are 2 eras, and the transition to Island was a watershed. I listened to Earthspan last night and was as drawn into it and enthralled as I've ever been.


2 eras is a little too simplistic, I think.  Fwiw, I'd define the eras as:

Debut
5000 Spirits - I looked Up
U which exists in a universe of its own Grin
Liquid Acrobat - Earthspan
No Ruinous Feud - Hard Rope

plus the reunion, of course.
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