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Author Topic: A worrying hidden message?  (Read 9382 times)
DarrenWilliams
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« Reply #40 on: March 03, 2020, 11:17:37 AM »

Talking of Aunt Sally, and immediately back off-topic, I've always been puzzled by the line in A Bone Through Her Nose by RT:

Her boyfriend plays in Scritti Politti, Aunt Sally's brown bread.

Anyone care to interpret?
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davidmjs
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« Reply #41 on: March 03, 2020, 11:37:01 AM »


Talking of Aunt Sally, and immediately back off-topic, I've always been puzzled by the line in A Bone Through Her Nose by RT:

Her boyfriend plays in Scritti Politti, Aunt Sally's brown bread.

Anyone care to interpret?


Cockney rhyming slang for dead, isn't it?
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Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right.
bassline (Mike)
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« Reply #42 on: March 03, 2020, 11:38:30 AM »


Talking of Aunt Sally, and immediately back off-topic, I've always been puzzled by the line in A Bone Through Her Nose by RT:

Her boyfriend plays in Scritti Politti, Aunt Sally's brown bread.

Anyone care to interpret?


That verse seems to be a list of ways she might accrue some money...Aunt Sally's will perhaps ?
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RobertD
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« Reply #43 on: March 03, 2020, 11:44:17 AM »



Back on topic, I now have a copy of Shuffle and Go which looks to me like a scene from a pub in the 1950s with the teddy boy on the right taking a break from playing some songs on his guitar while a group of Morris dancers prop up the bar. Quite what the significance of the pram is I don't know. All quite nostalgic really.



It's absolutely a scene from a Cotswold/Oxfordshire pub circa late 1950s. The Aunt Sally shy and Cotswold Morris paraphernalia give the place, while the guitar, teddy boy and pram give the date. (I used to be pushed around in a pram identical to that - inherited from my elder brothers.) My view is that it marks the point at which traditional English rural folk style made way for rock and roll.

You should give Aunt Sally a go sometime. It's quite liberating being able to hurl big sticks around.

Cheers

Nick



And with that knowledge in hand and interpreting the cover further perhaps the pram is a passing reference to The Year Of Fifty Nine? 3 years old as sung in the song is probably too old to still be in a pram (thats purely a guess on my part) but if the cover is ‘representing’ the songs, then surely its for this one?
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DarrenWilliams
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« Reply #44 on: March 03, 2020, 11:55:13 AM »



Talking of Aunt Sally, and immediately back off-topic, I've always been puzzled by the line in A Bone Through Her Nose by RT:

Her boyfriend plays in Scritti Politti, Aunt Sally's brown bread.

Anyone care to interpret?


Cockney rhyming slang for dead, isn't it?


Yes, so does that mean the game Aunt Sally is dead? Possibly something about old traditions dying out vs new (at the time) music? Which kind of gets the thread back on track...
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David W
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« Reply #45 on: March 04, 2020, 09:13:42 AM »


Back on topic, I now have a copy of Shuffle and Go which looks to me like a scene from a pub in the 1950s with the teddy boy on the right taking a break from playing some songs on his guitar while a group of Morris dancers prop up the bar. Quite what the significance of the pram is I don't know. All quite nostalgic really.




Its all in the song - description of Teddy Boy, the old Aunt Sally, rock amnd roll, baby on the way, Morris tune at the end ...

DW
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