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Author Topic: Listening to.......  (Read 94720 times)
RobertD
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« Reply #1120 on: March 25, 2020, 01:39:31 PM »

So far today in the work from home scenario I have played a trio of Whippersnapper albums (on cassette!). So that would be Promises, Tsubo, and These Foolish Strings. I'm particular fond of that last one, purchased at Cecil Sharp House in September of 1990 on my very first trip to England. First day now that I think of it in fact!
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Jules Gray
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« Reply #1121 on: March 27, 2020, 10:10:15 AM »

Bob Dylan's new gift to the world, the surprisingly moving epic song poem, Murder Most Fowl.

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/hear-bob-dylans-new-song-973993/

Jules
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davidmjs
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« Reply #1122 on: March 27, 2020, 11:20:29 AM »


Bob Dylan's new gift to the world, the surprisingly moving epic song poem, Murder Most Fowl.

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/hear-bob-dylans-new-song-973993/

Jules


Well, who the hell saw that one coming?  Utterly brilliant.
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« Reply #1123 on: March 27, 2020, 12:17:48 PM »

*Foul

Always got those two words muddled.

Jules
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GubGub (Al)
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« Reply #1124 on: March 27, 2020, 12:48:40 PM »


Bob Dylan's new gift to the world, the surprisingly moving epic song poem, Murder Most Fowl.

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/hear-bob-dylans-new-song-973993/

Jules


Is it about a poultry farm?  Wink

It is  really interesting song. I need to give it repeated listens to really process it.

I am currently listening to Richard Thompson Live At Rock City, Nottingham November -1986 which is almost wholly enjoyable. I do think though that Angel Air could have done enough research to find out that The Life & Loves Of A She Devil Theme Tune is actually called Warm Love Gone Cold rather than just transcribe what it said on the tape box onto the CD sleeve. It is a great song, best heard on Christine Collister's own Live album. Unfortunately the performance here is a bit of a dirge, in contrast to the rest of the show.
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« Reply #1125 on: March 27, 2020, 01:06:12 PM »


Bob Dylan's new gift to the world, the surprisingly moving epic song poem, Murder Most Fowl.

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/hear-bob-dylans-new-song-973993/

Jules


Sounds like a cross between Knockin On Heavens Door and Tempest. Superb. Thanks Bob. Apparently its his longest ever song.
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Bingers (Chris)
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« Reply #1126 on: March 27, 2020, 04:17:16 PM »


Really liked the new Dylan song to start off with but I’m afraid my attention drifted halfway through and I lost focus. Will definitely give it another listen though. Just wondering what inspired Bob to release an epic song poem now about the Kennedy assassination almost 57 years after the event? Thanks for the link
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« Reply #1127 on: March 27, 2020, 04:26:44 PM »



Really liked the new Dylan song to start off with but I’m afraid my attention drifted halfway through and I lost focus. Will definitely give it another listen though. Just wondering what inspired Bob to release an epic song poem now about the Kennedy assassination almost 57 years after the event? Thanks for the link


I'm not entirely convinced it is about the Kennedy assassination....
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« Reply #1128 on: March 27, 2020, 05:04:49 PM »




Really liked the new Dylan song to start off with but I’m afraid my attention drifted halfway through and I lost focus. Will definitely give it another listen though. Just wondering what inspired Bob to release an epic song poem now about the Kennedy assassination almost 57 years after the event? Thanks for the link


I'm not entirely convinced it is about the Kennedy assassination....


Indeed so. I think that is just the jumping off point for a meditation on how we got to where we are now. But I need to listen again. Several times.
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« Reply #1129 on: March 28, 2020, 03:08:19 PM »

For those that did enjoy the new Dylan song, some of you might be interested in this I found on FB (not sure who wrote it I'm afraid):

REFERENCES IN BOB DYLAN'S "MURDER MOST FOUL"
1. “Living in a nightmare on Elm Street”
Elm Street is the actual road in Dallas where Kennedy was assassinated. Fifteen years later, Wes Craven’s horror classic Nightmare on Elm Street, about a deranged psychopath who slaughters children in their dreams, hit movie theaters. The connection to JFK’s death is most likely not a complete coincidence, though Craven never commented on the matter.

2. “Frankly, Miss Scarlett, I don’t give a damn”
This comes straight from the mouth of Clark Gable’s character of Rhett Butler in Gone With the Wind. In the original Margaret Mitchell book, Butler says, “My dear, I don’t give a damn.” This was changed to, “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn” in the movie. In “Murder Most Foul,” Dylan puts yet another tiny spin on it.

3. “Tommy, can you hear me? I’m the Acid Queen”
These are two lines from the Who’s 1969 rock opera, Tommy, about a deaf, dumb, and blind pinball wizard. The Acid Queen is a woman hired by his family who tries to restore his senses, either by dosing him with LSD or having sex with him. The song isn’t quite clear.

4. “Wake up, little Susie; let’s go for a drive”
“Wake Up Little Susie” is a 1957 hit by the Everly Brothers, written by Felice Bryant and Boudleaux Bryant. After the assassination of Kennedy, it seemed like a relic from a distant, innocent past.

5. “I’m just a patsy like Patsy Cline”
Lee Harvey Oswald told the press he was “just a patsy” after he was apprehended. Patsy Cline is a country legend who also died tragically young in 1963.

6. “What’s new, pussycat? What’d I say?”
“What’s New Pussycat” is a 1965 Tom Jones hit written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. “What’d I Say” is a 1959 Ray Charles R&B classic. Their only real connection is that their titles both pose a question.

7. “Wolfman Jack, speaking in tongues”
Wolfman Jack was a raspy-voiced radio DJ whose popularity peaked in the early Sixties. In 1973, he portrayed himself in the George Lucas film 'American Graffiti' as the cultural embodiment of the era in which the film took place.

8. “Take me to the place Tom Dooley was hung”
Tom Dula was a Confederate war veteran who was convicted of murdering a woman named Laura Foster. He was hanged in 1868, but questions linger to this day about his guilt. He was the inspiration for the folk song “Tom Dooley,” which was covered by the Kingston Trio in 1958. Dylan’s rise in the early Sixties made groups like them seem hopelessly passé.

9. “Play ‘Please, Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood’ “
“Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” is a 1964 Nina Simone song that the Animals turned into a rock hit the following year. Animals keyboardist Alan Price left the group shortly after it was recorded. He appears alongside Bob Dylan throughout the documentary 'Don’t Look Back'.

10. “Play Don Henley, play Glenn Frey/Take it to the limit and let it go by”
Don Henley and Glenn Frey are the main songwriting team in the Eagles, and sang most of their hits. “Take It to the Limit,” however, features Eagles bassist Randy Meisner on lead vocals. He left the band in 1977, and the only time he’s performed with them since then was at their 1998 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

11. “Play it for Carl Wilson, too/Looking far, far away down Gower Avenue”
Carl Wilson was one of the founding members of the Beach Boys. In 1976, he sang background vocals on the Warren Zevon song “Desperados Under the Eaves,” which contains the line, “Look away down Gower Avenue, look away.” Dylan is a longtime fan of Zevon. In 2002, shortly before Zevon’s death, he played many of his songs in concert.

12. “Play Etta James, too. Play ‘I’d Rather Go Blind’ “
Blues singer Etta James had a big hit with “I’d Rather Go Blind” in 1968, which she wrote with Ellington Jordan and Billy Foster.

13. “Play ‘Blue Sky’; play Dickey Betts”
“Blue Sky” is a 1972 Allman Brothers Band song from their album 'Eat a Peach'. It’s one of the last songs that Duane Allman worked on before his death. But as Dylan notes, it was written by Dickey Betts.

14. “Play something for the Birdman of Alcatraz”
'The Birdman of Alcatraz' is a 1962 Burt Lancaster film about a real-life convicted murderer, Robert Stroud, who became fixated on birds after his arrest. Dylan may reference him in the song because he died one day before JFK. C.S. Lewis and Aldous Huxley died on the same day as Kennedy, though their deaths receive almost no attention.
15. “Play ‘Down In The Boondocks’ for Terry Malloy”
Terry Malloy is the dockworker who Marlon Brando portrayed in the 1954 classic 'On the Waterfront'. “Down in the Boondocks” is a 1965 Billie Joe Royal song written by Joe South, who plays guitar on Dylan’s 'Blonde on Blonde''.

16. “Play ‘Anything Goes’ and ‘Memphis in June’ “
“Anything Goes” is the title song from a 1934 Broadway musical, with lyrics by Cole Porter. “Memphis in June” is a 1945 Hoagy Carmichael song. Dylan previously referenced it in his 1985 track “Tight Connection to My Heart.'”

17. Play ‘Lonely at the Top’ and ‘Lonely Are the Brave'”
“Lonely at the Top” has been used as a title for songs by Randy Newman, Bon Jovi, Mick Jagger, and even Chamillionaire. The Randy Newman title is, by far, the most famous, and probably the one Dylan is referencing here. 'Lonely Are the Brave' is a 1962 Kirk Douglas Western based on Edward Abbey’s novel 'The Brave Cowboy'.

18. “Play ‘Love Me or Leave Me’ by the great Bud Powell”
Bud Powell was a wildly innovative jazz pianist of the Fifties and Sixties who died of tuberculosis in 1966, when he was just 41. “Love Me or Leave Me” is a 1928 Walter Davidson/Gus Kahn song from the Broadway play 'Whoopee!' It was covered by everyone from Ruth Etting to Nina Simone to Ella Fitzgerald. It’s unclear, however, if there’s a version by Bud Powell. He certainly didn’t write it.

19 “Play ‘Marching Through Georgia’ and ‘Dumbarton’s Drums’ “
“Marching Through Georgia” is a Civil War-era song about William Tecumseh Sherman’s March to the Sea, a brutal and destructive military campaign that crippled the Confederacy near the end of the war. “Dumbarton’s Drums” is a Scottish song dating back to the 18th century.

20. “Play ‘The Blood-Stained Banner,’ play ‘Murder Most Foul’ “
“The Blood-Stained Banner” is a nickname given to the third and final official flag of the Confederacy. It was unveiled just weeks before Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox Court House, ending the Civil War. “Murder Most Foul” is the title of this new Dylan song that is so long and epic, it wraps up with a reference to itself.
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Col D
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« Reply #1130 on: March 29, 2020, 10:39:18 AM »


I am currently listening to Richard Thompson Live At Rock City, Nottingham November -1986 which is almost wholly enjoyable. I do think though that Angel Air could have done enough research to find out that The Life & Loves Of A She Devil Theme Tune is actually called Warm Love Gone Cold rather than just transcribe what it said on the tape box onto the CD sleeve. It is a great song, best heard on Christine Collister's own Live album. Unfortunately the performance here is a bit of a dirge, in contrast to the rest of the show.


It's a bit of a mixed bag really. Sound quality is surprisingly decent - having been streaming it for a few weeks prior to getting the CD, the impression I got initially was that it wasn't a great improvement on the off-air recording in circulation, but thankfully the CD does actually sound appreciably better. On the other hand there's the incorrect song title and the appalling cover that makes even the worst grey area release look like a work of art. Then there's the missing end of the set that was part of the original broadcast - Willow Tree/Bean Setting/Shooting, Flying Saucer Rock & Roll, Ghosts in the Wind and Pavanne, what happened to them? Overall a decent release that could have been a lot better with a bit more care and attention to detail.
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Jules Gray
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« Reply #1131 on: March 29, 2020, 11:37:31 AM »


4. “Wake up, little Susie; let’s go for a drive”
“Wake Up Little Susie” is a 1957 hit by the Everly Brothers, written by Felice Bryant and Boudleaux Bryant. After the assassination of Kennedy, it seemed like a relic from a distant, innocent past.


Also worth nothing that Suze (pronounced Susie) Rotolo was Bob's girlfriend in 1963.

Jules
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Amethyst (Jenny)
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« Reply #1132 on: March 29, 2020, 02:39:02 PM »

Clocks...  hundreds of them have all been wound up... ticktockticktockticktock… aaarrgrggg!!!
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« Reply #1133 on: March 29, 2020, 04:07:11 PM »

The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain. Not seen them for about 8 years and there’s been a few changes of personnel (as with any orchestra). This is their version of Higher and Higher, recorded in isolation  Cheesy

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Fm65dbcietQ&feature=youtu.be
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« Reply #1134 on: March 29, 2020, 04:13:44 PM »

Boo Hewerdine's live set from the Isolation Festival this afternoon.
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Alan2
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« Reply #1135 on: March 30, 2020, 09:11:25 AM »

Fairport convention: A History of (Island 2LP, pink rim, red ribbon, 197?).

Fairport Convention: Nine (Island Masters CD, 1992).
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Chris from Fieldtown
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« Reply #1136 on: March 30, 2020, 10:19:05 AM »


Boo Hewerdine's live set from the Isolation Festival this afternoon.


Brilliant stuff, sublime voice and great songwriting
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« Reply #1137 on: March 30, 2020, 05:29:51 PM »

The Goons - Lurgi Strikes Britain

I'm on a strict diet of Comedy, one minute of 'news' morning noon and night's enough..

Be safe y'all.... Smiley



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« Reply #1138 on: March 30, 2020, 07:36:19 PM »

Finally found a copy of Show Of Hands' Covers 2. High quality interpretations abound!
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GubGub (Al)
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« Reply #1139 on: March 30, 2020, 09:20:11 PM »


The Goons - Lurgi Strikes Britain

I'm on a strict diet of Comedy, one minute of 'news' morning noon and night's enough..

Be safe y'all.... Smiley






The very origin of the word lurgi. Invented by Spike Milligan and now in common parlance (too common at the moment  Sad).
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