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Author Topic: The Soundtrack Of A Photograph Blog  (Read 86645 times)
RobertD
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« on: November 14, 2013, 04:53:20 AM »

Hi all, just wanted to announce I have started a blog. It has been a terrifying prospect for me, but after scrapping an attempt earlier this year I came up with another idea for it and am calling it The Soundtrack Of A Photograph, which will explore the connection between the music I love and my own photographs. I still have some tweaking to do to and am still trying to figure WordPress out to its full effect, but please check out the Introduction and my first entry which I have called, Ralph, Irving, and Peking, which might give you a clue what it is about! Big thanks to Jules and Al of this parish for help and advice, and Joanna for a very kind offer. Thank you!

http://robpatdoy.wordpress.com
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« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2013, 09:30:50 AM »

A terrific marriage of pictures and words, Robert.  Quality stuff!  I look forward to more.

Jules
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GubGub (Al)
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« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2013, 09:50:07 AM »

It is open on my PC as I write waiting for me to have a few quiet minutes at work to read it.
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Will S
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« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2013, 10:16:23 AM »

Very good, Robert.  I enjoyed that - and all the more for having heard Ralph singing the song live for the first time the other night.
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« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2013, 11:10:58 AM »

An interesting read and all the more so to me for being based around a song that I am afraid to say I am not particularly fond of. But I like the connections that arise from your writing. The way that 21st century New York connects to the English folk tradition by way of a song about an adventurer from nearly a century ago.

Sad to hear about the state of the Seaport. On my various trips to NY I have never managed to get there and was thinking as I read your blog that I really must make the effort to do so if I ever get back to the city but it sounds as though that opportunity might be denied to me.

Your blog also reminded me of my own visit to Mystic Seaport. Have you ever been? Many fine old ships and at the time of my visit a life size replica of the Amistad. It moved me in ways similar to the ones you describe, though I was unable to suppress the temptation to make pirate noises!
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RobertD
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« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2013, 11:37:36 AM »

Thanks so much everyone. I had a moment of panic just before hitting "publish" last night but I am glad people are enjoying it along with my idea for the blog itself. I have a second one mapped out and have ideas for several more.  Smiley Phew!
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« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2013, 11:42:51 AM »


An interesting read and all the more so to me for being based around a song that I am afraid to say I am not particularly fond of. But I like the connections that arise from your writing. The way that 21st century New York connects to the English folk tradition by way of a song about an adventurer from nearly a century ago.

Sad to hear about the state of the Seaport. On my various trips to NY I have never managed to get there and was thinking as I read your blog that I really must make the effort to do so if I ever get back to the city but it sounds as though that opportunity might be denied to me.

Your blog also reminded me of my own visit to Mystic Seaport. Have you ever been? Many fine old ships and at the time of my visit a life size replica of the Amistad. It moved me in ways similar to the ones you describe, though I was unable to suppress the temptation to make pirate noises!


Thanks Al. The Seaport may yet rise again, but its going to take a long time, and as I say the city wants to view it in a development sense, preservationists want to view it in a historical sense, and there doesn't seem to be a common ground in terms of preserving the culture. We shall see. I have been to Mystic Seaport several times, it is indeed a wonderful place. Must go there again in springtime for another visit.

PS, I often make pirate noises, or pretend I am Captain Haddock in moments like that, silently saying, Avast! Ye lubberly scum, so I know the feeling  Wink
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« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2013, 12:53:39 PM »

Bravo Robert!  Grin

I was interested to read about the "Wavertree", as that's the name of a suburb of Liverpool, so I must do some investigation about the vessel.

Coming from a family with strong links to the sea - Grandad worked for the Cunard line (in the Royal Liver building), and Dad for the Mersey Docks & Harbour Board - I do feel an affinity to all things maritime.  

Although I live well away from the open sea, at least Gloucester has some fine historic docks - which reminds me I should dig out Ashley's "By Gloucester Docks" LP.
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« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2013, 12:55:44 PM »


I should dig out Ashley's "By Gloucester Docks" LP.


About to be reissued on CD by Talking Elephant by the way.
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« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2013, 01:01:59 PM »

Great stuff
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Bob Barrows
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« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2013, 01:06:31 PM »

Nicely written Robert. I've shared it in the All Things Nautical group on Facebook.
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PaulT
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« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2013, 02:07:38 PM »



I should dig out Ashley's "By Gloucester Docks" LP.


About to be reissued on CD by Talking Elephant by the way.


Thanks Al!  Smiley
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« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2013, 02:14:20 PM »

Apologies for double post, but I just found this on a Victoriana website:

The Wavertree. Launched 1885. Constructed at Southampton for R. W. Leyland & Co. of Liverpool. Extreme length: 325 ft; length on deck: 263 ft; beam: 49 ft 2".  Now (2006) at South Street Seaport Museum, New York, New York.

She was first employed to carry jute, using in making rope and birlap bags, between eastern India (now Bangladesh) and Scotland.
By the time Wavertree was built, she was nearly obsolete. Steam engines suitable for efficiently propelling ships across the ocean had been introduced in the 170s, and were being used on nearly all the shorter trade routes. While this was taking place, iron — long the choice of ship builders in iron-producing countries such as Britain — was giving way to steel. Wavertree was one of the last large sailing ships built of wrought iron. Today she is the largest such still afloat.

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« Reply #13 on: November 14, 2013, 02:35:05 PM »

Bill, Bob and Paul, thank you.

Bob-appreciate the share on All Things Nautical, I have joined it myself now!

Paul, sorry I was commuting to work and was not able to answer on your inquiry about the Wavertree, but glad you found the answer. She is a fine ship as well and I had no idea it was a suburb of Liverpool.
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« Reply #14 on: November 14, 2013, 02:59:51 PM »


I had no idea it was a suburb of Liverpool.


Immortalised wonderfully in song by Ian McNabb and now reproduced on the Lyrics Board
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« Reply #15 on: November 14, 2013, 03:25:01 PM »

Always nice to read something by someone with a passion!

I saw that there is a Schermerhorn Row in New York, Schermerhorn is a tiny village in the North West of Holland and has about 1200 inhabitants, I guess that when people from that village migrated to the US there must have been even less inhabitants but still even now there is a street named after it.

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JJ (Joanna)
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« Reply #16 on: November 14, 2013, 03:34:43 PM »

Lovely idea Robert, so glad you shared it with us. The story come to life in stunning photos and made real with that song....  Wink
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GubGub (Al)
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« Reply #17 on: November 14, 2013, 03:36:00 PM »


Always nice to read something by someone with a passion!

I saw that there is a Schermerhorn Row in New York, Schermerhorn is a tiny village in the North West of Holland and has about 1200 inhabitants, I guess that when people from that village migrated to the US there must have been even less inhabitants but still even now there is a street named after it.




A legacy of Manhattan having been originally settled by the Dutch perhaps.
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RobertD
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« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2013, 03:54:45 PM »

Yes Ronald, it is indeed a legacy of the Dutch, and there are numerous reminders of the days of New Amsterdam still to be found. The Van Dyke Expressway, Gansevoort Street, the Kill Van Kull and many more. Schermerhorn Row is the remainder of the old 19th century buildings that have been a cornerstone of the South Street Seaport. Thanks for the compliment, you as well Joanna!
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« Reply #19 on: November 14, 2013, 05:53:19 PM »

Interesting piece mate and well written,  I look forward to the next one. Now if you can add beer reviews into the mix as well your onto a winner  Wink
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