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Author Topic: Is it just me.....?  (Read 19527 times)
Paul
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« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2006, 09:13:45 AM »

Got to agree with Groove. Muse in particular are excellent, razorlight are good, and there are loads of good up and coming bands. We're going to see Iron Maiden soon, and they are supported by Trivium - I havn't heard them yet, but have had good reports from students.

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« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2006, 12:56:39 PM »

dont go paul , trivium are unadulterated noise merchants, or at least what ive heard via the lad is
not my cup of tea, and i like a bit of rock
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« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2006, 01:19:08 PM »

Got to agree with Groove. Muse in particular are excellent, razorlight are good, and there are loads of good up and coming bands. We're going to see Iron Maiden soon, and they are supported by Trivium - I havn't heard them yet, but have had good reports from students.

Paul

paul  http://www.myspace.com/trivium Good luck Roll Eyes Undecided
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« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2006, 05:11:11 PM »

Trivium - Not too bad, a bit like Metallica but nowhere near as polished.
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« Reply #24 on: October 13, 2006, 10:52:28 AM »



NB there has been very little good music since 1971 (thought I'd stir that old pot of chestnuts again...)

Rubbish!

Auteurs
Kraftwerk
Portishead
Bellowhead
Tim Van Eiken
Eliza Carthy
Springsteens new one
Neil Youngs best work
..

..

Rambles of in to the distance with a list of 180000 acts.

I am gonna have to agree with JoD on this one - although I may add a handful of years to his date of 1971. Its all very well naming your 180,000 acts, but they would be swamped 1000 fold by the amount of dross released in the same period.

Take two of your examples - Young and Springsteen. If we take out the albums they have made that are decent and put them in one pile, then compare it to the huge number of absolutely sh*te discs they have released over the same period - JoD has a point.

 Wink

I'd say Young was 50-50. In fact his best work has been done since 1971.

Sure theres a lot of dross - but if you said to me 'you can either have all your CD's released before 1971, or all the ones after, then I would take 'After'. Sure I'd lose the Beatles and the Byrds, and Fairports hayday, but I would gain punk, most Reggae, electronica, the current folk revival (which is more to my taste then the 60's one) etc etc.
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« Reply #25 on: October 16, 2006, 04:34:23 PM »

Lulu, Cilla Black, Ken Dodd...

The 60s were rubbish too.

None of these acts were rubbish IMHO. All three acts are still going strong to this day........ Grin

From Rob
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« Reply #26 on: October 17, 2006, 11:45:14 AM »

Ah yes, the great 1970's - "Jump Up And Down And Wave Your Knickers In The Air", Shawaddywaddy, Telly Savalas "sings" If...

Them were the good old days...


I was NOT extolling the virtue of "1970's Music" when I made my once-ironic comment about there having been no good music since 1971.... Eyes open now??

Also my reiteration of my helpful phrase in this thread was double-ironic with ironic overtones... clearly grasped by the yawning cognoscenti...
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« Reply #27 on: October 17, 2006, 02:44:33 PM »

I'm with Jack.

Ironically, of course.......... Wink

The 80s were a bloody awful desert though - musically, politically, culturally, sartorially.  I guess we got the music that the mores merited.

Live Aid can't save a **** decade.

Hmmm, not altogether sure where that came from, but they were awful, weren't they?
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« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2006, 05:34:32 PM »



Having danced my way through the 80's (which had some really good dance music if you like that sort of thing)  I was seriously depressed by the 90's with it's hip hop, rap, garage etc. But the 90's was the decade I dusted down and played my Steeleye and Tull albums, and discovered The Albion Band, Oyster Band, Chris While and Julie Mathews, Chris Leslie which led to Fairport.  It was the decade that I joined a folk band and we are still going strong!.  Thank god for the terrible music of the 90's as it led me truly back to folk!
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« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2006, 05:44:27 PM »

I'm with Jack.

Ironically, of course.......... Wink

The 80s were a bloody awful desert though - musically, politically, culturally, sartorially.  I guess we got the music that the mores merited.

Live Aid can't save a **** decade.

Hmmm, not altogether sure where that came from, but they were awful, weren't they?

Yes and no.  Out of that awfulness came a lot of unity and a sense of purpose that have not really been seen since.  Politics was I suppose so polarised by Thatcher that if one stood against her, one really stood against her.  Some of my strongest emotions (good as well as bad) were felt on picket lines and fundraising events during the Miners Strike and at Wapping, and on anti Nuclear and anti-military events etc.  Musically as well, there were 'sub-tribes' that produced some good stuff...generally looking back mind, rather than creating a new sound...the Paisley Underground scene for instance (Rain Parade, Dream Syndicate, True West, Green on Red etc) and I also have a strong passion for the powerful sound of the Anarcho-punks like Crass & co.  And let's remember that rap didn't only produce Vanilla Ice, it also gave us Public Enemy.
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« Reply #30 on: October 17, 2006, 05:55:03 PM »

Maybe you're right.  I never really scratched much below the surface, although Billy Bragg and Elvis Costello stand out against the dross for their consistent commitment.  I confess to taking refuge in classical music for most of the decade and probably only woke up when I first heard the opening chords of Roll With It and thought it was the new Beatles single.

If it hadn't been for the two guys named above plus Richard Thompson and one or two others I probably wouldn't have come back at all and would have sold my guitars and stopped writing.

An opportunity missed, I hear the masses cry.........
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I built the ships that sailed this river
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I rolled the steel at Dixons Blazes
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« Reply #31 on: October 17, 2006, 06:08:18 PM »


An opportunity missed, I hear the masses cry.........

Ahem. Lips Sealed Wink
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« Reply #32 on: October 17, 2006, 07:55:32 PM »

I'm always utterly baffled that people find wastelands in any decade or year unless, of course, you're referring to popular music. I've never known of one year  that was not positively drunken with great new music. I expectnothing from popular music, the Beatles in specific opened a door in 1964 that briefly saw popular music coalesce with art. This was an anomaly whose like I haven't expected to see again any more than I expect to see the next Michael Jordan or whatever your national paragon of athleticism might be. One of the great lessons of Fairport Convention and many of my other musical standard bearers is to have your ears open to anything, but, at the same time, life is short, be ready to rapidly close the door on the next big thing.
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« Reply #33 on: October 17, 2006, 08:12:22 PM »

Is it just me...Or is there far to much bollix talked about music?

All music is in the ear of the listener.  Stuff I hated with great passion when I was younger I now find myself sheepishly seeking out.  Stuff I thought was cool when younger, I hardly listen too now, just because it is no longer cool(insert wicked or some other up-to date phrase here), but when I do, its like coming home!

The 50's I don't personal recall, well I was only 4 when they ended., the 60's mostly passed me by as I did not listen to much music then,(blame the parents).  The 70's were when I got into music, but, it was mostly the radio 1, top of the pops stuff.  I was then introduced to the Velvet Underground via Mott the Hooples B side to "all the young dudes".  Yes and prog rock followed as did Quo and he heavy rock stuff.  The 80's were a bit of a personal desert as were the 90's, some good stuff but a lot of fashionable music that meant little or nothing to me.

Nowdays I am listening too and mostly enjoying a plethora of musical styles and artists, and damn well enjoying it.  Even the stuff I don't like much  has some sort of merit, as some poor sod has put his life and soul into it, even if it is just a boy/girl band.  Until the day that music is just randomly produced by a computer I will keep on listening.  I will even give the computer the odd listen.

Mark


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« Reply #34 on: October 18, 2006, 02:55:33 PM »

I loved the re-working of 'Career Opportunities' by the Clash on Sandanista, one of my favourite songs ever, so sometimes it is worth doing.

The 80s seemed dire at the time, and looking back, but I can still think of Specials, Siouxsie, Clash, Bragg, BAD, Steve Earle, Paul Simon,  Nanci Griffith, NWA, Public Enemy, Robert Cray, New Order, and all that Madchester stuff and summer of love stuff, so the decade had plenty of highs, and I've only named a few faves off the top of my head.  Cheesy
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david stevenson
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« Reply #35 on: October 18, 2006, 05:11:09 PM »

I concede that there was some good music in the 80s, just not enough of it.  Mark's comment about music produced by a computer hits home - that's what most of it sounded like to me.

It also depends on your circumstances at the time.  We had a very young family, struggling financially and found ourselves in a climate where the prevailing value was f*** you and everyone else, I'm climbing to the top regardless.  Most of the music seemed like an all too appropriate soundtrack.

On the other hand, I developed a deep and lasting affection for the symphonies of Sibelius, Shostakovich and Mahler in particular, so it wasn't all bad.

Blimey, i sound like a refugee straight from Radio 3!!!
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I built the ships that sailed this river
I cut the stones that built this town
I rolled the steel at Dixons Blazes
I cried inside as they tore it all down

- STILL MY CITY
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« Reply #36 on: October 18, 2006, 05:28:49 PM »

We had a very young family, struggling financially and found ourselves in a climate where the prevailing value was f*** you and everyone else, I'm climbing to the top regardless.  Most of the music seemed like an all too appropriate soundtrack.


Has that changed then? Damn - the implied change from Thatcherite morals must have passed me by.  It's certainly what it still looks like to me....   Wink

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« Reply #37 on: October 18, 2006, 05:32:07 PM »

Dunno David, our kids have grown up now.  Grin Wink

Maybe it's just the music that's changed and the relative ease of access to the vast range that's now available, regardless of your preferences.  Thank you for the internet.
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I built the ships that sailed this river
I cut the stones that built this town
I rolled the steel at Dixons Blazes
I cried inside as they tore it all down

- STILL MY CITY
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« Reply #38 on: October 18, 2006, 09:53:25 PM »

Music is certainly more accessible now, even without the internet, CDs are so cheap, especially the old stuff, and you can take music with you more or less wherever you go - discs or ipods, and the specialist stations on Digital, as well as the great variety on R2 in the evenings. So it is much easier to avoid the chart music and the chart radio stations, if you wish to.

So what I am saying is that maybe the charts are still awful, mostly, but now we can choose to listen to other stuff. I always used to know what the number one was, what were the big hits, because that was all there was,the same stations on everywhere, shops, offices, building sites, cars.
Now it is surely better, musically anyway (the country itself is f***ed and we are up a creek without a paddle, but at least we can choose our own soundtrack as we head for oblivion  Tiara ).
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