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Author Topic: Do you remember the first time......  (Read 22820 times)
fat Billy(Bill)
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« on: September 05, 2006, 03:15:33 PM »

That you heard some serious folk music?

I was about 13 or 14 in the early seventies and my local church youth club got a band in. I did'nt know it at the time but they were covering steeleye span songs. They were good to. when they played two magicians I was blown away. They finished with Thomas the rhymer I could'nt get it out of my head. Took me a couple of years to find out where the songs came from and I've been listening ever since.

when was your first time
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Amethyst (Jenny)
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« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2006, 03:29:29 PM »

At school in the 6th form... we had a common room and a regular folk club gathering.. there was a girl called Jan (!) and another called Tina... and others probably from the local boy's school.. it WAs a very long time ago!

Can't recall titles of much that they played.. but there was Leonard Cohen Suzanne, Banks of the Ohio (did he write that?) and songs such as Crazy man Michael.. and songs by a certain Sandy Denny too...
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« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2006, 03:30:53 PM »

At the home of some friends of my parents in about '75.  Morris On was played on the gramaphone and I was hooked from the age of eight.

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« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2006, 03:45:00 PM »

1975 again, when my sister came home with Steeleye's  "All Around My Hat" LP.
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« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2006, 03:59:22 PM »

Hearing the Weavers on the radio when I was really young (That's Pete'n'Peggy Seeger and friends for those of you younger than me Smiley

(Big argument starts now as to whether that was folk Grin)

As far as Native English Folk is concerned that would be the Aldermaston March in '62, things like The Sun is in the Sky. Ewan McColl wrote most of that stuff.

First folk acts I paid to see at the Oddfellows Hall, Portsmouth in '65/'66:- Paul Simon, Carolyn Hester, The New Lost City Ramblers and Tom Paxton.

There's a quirky set of memories Smiley

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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2006, 04:32:49 PM »

bbc singing for schools
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« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2006, 04:59:15 PM »

I've mentioned these before but in chronological order;

The girl who babysat me had Living In The Past as a single. I used to pester her to play it repeatedly. It and the band with the funny name I coudn't remember dropped off my radar for 15-20 years after that. Finding it again and hearing it at Cropredy was beyond special.
A couple of middle aged ladies, Jaqi and Bridie who used to travel around Liverpool schools singing folk songs, in particular Mist over the Mersey and Streets Of London.
The Spinners and the Houghton Weavers used to pop up on local TV.
Mike Harding's Bomber's Moon was the first folk album I bought.

Hard to tell which one is the first serious folk moment.
Now I think about it, it's been an interest that developed in parallel to whatever was around at the time.
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« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2006, 05:12:54 PM »


 Ralph McTell - Streets of London. When I was about seven, I think, it was on the radio a lot. It was the first song I'd ever heard about ordinary, fragile people, and it actually made me cry.

  Thinking about it, though, my dad used to sing "Molly Malone" to me sometimes when I was very small. I guess that song was almost a precursor to "Streets of London" and had the same melancholy atmosphere; is it regarded as a folk song, anybody, please?  Huh

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« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2006, 05:28:16 PM »

  Thinking about it, though, my dad used to sing "Molly Malone" to me sometimes when I was very small. I guess that song was almost a precursor to "Streets of London" and had the same melancholy atmosphere; is it regarded as a folk song, anybody, please?  Huh

'Molly Malone'...wey aye, definitely! That's the sort of thing most people would think of if you say you're into folk music.
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« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2006, 05:31:29 PM »

Does Country Dancing in a small village Primary school count? If it does, when I was about 4.

Serious folk, probably FC when I was about 16, going to Croppers etc.
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Amethyst (Jenny)
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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2006, 05:39:55 PM »

If Danny Boy counts.. then my dad always sang that when he'd been on the Guinness, so from the first time I could hear anything then!!
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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2006, 06:33:49 PM »

bbc singing for schools

That rings with me too - we were always singing Hebridean songs and Burns songs at primary school.
After that it was Robin Hall and Jimmy McGregor, the Spinners and the Corries on TV.

First real folkie experience was following a motley crew called The Great Fife Roadshow around the east of Scotland in 1970.  Some lineup - Rab Noakes, Archie Fisher, bits of Lindisfarne and a very young Barbara Dickson.

Got my first guitar later that summer too.
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« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2006, 06:36:47 PM »

Actually, in chronology terms the previous post is cobblers.

Depends on your definition, but it was almost certainly John Peel playing Chelsea Morning and If I Had a Ribbon Bow in 1967 and spending all my pocket money on that first Fairport album that got me started.

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Paul
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« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2006, 06:45:29 PM »

2 things.

The 6th form college I was at made each tutor group do an assembly once a year. One of my friend's tutor group did the story of the man they couldn't hang, and played the songs live.

The drama group I was in in the sixth form was doing a Christmas variety show, and sang Gaudete. It is the first thing I ever sang in public (on the bass harmony). I then investigated further work.

Paul
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« Reply #14 on: September 05, 2006, 07:15:58 PM »

Fred Wedklock when I was around 13 or 14 in a local pub folk club sort of thing.  Remember a song about a policeman, and some one being called an ambulance.  Then got into proper music, rock, progressive etc and left the folk world behind until around 10 years ago when I bought a History of Fairport.   Shocked

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« Reply #15 on: September 05, 2006, 07:21:15 PM »

Fred Wedklock when I was around 13 or 14 in a local pub folk club sort of thing.  Remember a song about a policeman, and some one being called an ambulance.  Then got into proper music, rock, progressive etc and left the folk world behind until around 10 years ago when I bought a History of Fairport.   Shocked



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« Reply #16 on: September 05, 2006, 07:41:46 PM »

Actually, in chronology terms the previous post is cobblers.

Depends on your definition, but it was almost certainly John Peel playing Chelsea Morning and If I Had a Ribbon Bow in 1967 and spending all my pocket money on that first Fairport album that got me started.

See Jude - it's all your fault!!  Wink


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« Reply #17 on: September 05, 2006, 09:57:28 PM »

bbc singing for schools

That rings with me too - we were always singing Hebridean songs and Burns songs at primary school.
After that it was Robin Hall and Jimmy McGregor, the Spinners and the Corries on TV.

First real folkie experience was following a motley crew called The Great Fife Roadshow around the east of Scotland in 1970.  Some lineup - Rab Noakes, Archie Fisher, bits of Lindisfarne and a very young Barbara Dickson.

Much the same for me except it would be the White Heather Club first up followed swiftly by Hall & McGregor on Tonight. And I'd have to add the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem who I saw several times (well my folks are Irish).

David, we could easily have been at the same gig in the 70s as I remember the Roadshow crew as well! Small world sometimes eh  Cool

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« Reply #18 on: September 05, 2006, 10:05:57 PM »

Folk club at the Parson's Pightle in Old Coulsdon mid 1970s.

Chance for some under-age drinking at cheap prices, and good old-fashioned sing-along folk singing.

Then the rugby club (that used the same venue) lost the alcohol licence.  Roll Eyes

A folk club with no beer - well it just didn't work !  Tongue
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« Reply #19 on: September 06, 2006, 12:08:51 AM »

1964/5 - CND and a folk club after school. Our one male teacher played guitar and we listened to his records and sang along. Unheard of in a high school for 'gals'.

Sneaking into the Burton Folk Club aged 15 in 1965. It was in a pub in Stapenhill, the Barley Mow I think, and was all 'shhhh' and fingers in ears. I am sure I saw some influential people but their names meant little to me. I just enjoyed the music.

A year or so later I got in with a bad crowd and discovered other folk music, including early Fairport Grin Grin Grin

It was all downhill from there.
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