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Author Topic: So what's really happened since 77  (Read 11516 times)
Neil
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« on: July 19, 2006, 05:12:50 PM »

Jack raised the question in the L&L debate what has happened musically since 77.

So here we have it's very own thread.

My list would include Julian Cope for his loopy antics throughout most of the latter part of the 20th century.

Ian McNabb for his reflections on past genres and at times sounding more like Neil Young than Neil Young.

Roy Harpers live appearances throughout the eighties and nineties for the sheer outrage and insanity of those solo tours.

I even found myself liking the Orb at times.

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« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2006, 05:15:06 PM »

Boy bands ! Nuff said, now I'm going back to 1972.........................
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« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2006, 05:50:40 PM »

Springsteen maturing wonderfully to the point where he has become the most representative writer of what's good and bad about his homeland.  The emergence of Steve Earle.  Neil Young continuing to be daring and unpredictable. On this side of the water, Show of Hands showing everyone how to build a masive following by working very hard and being nice to their fans.

I'm really struggling beyond that.
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« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2006, 06:01:57 PM »

Two Tone records

The Jam (Debut single in 77)

Early '80s progressive rock (Marillion, Twelfth Night, IQ, Haze etc)

The whole re-emergence of 'real' country music of whom Steve Erale is certainly a shining star

That willl do me for starters
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« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2006, 06:03:58 PM »

In terms of pop I liked the Pet Shop Boys for one.

Songwriters? Blimey! Tom Waits emerged and has excelled for me, Randy Newman continued to bring out exemplary albums far above the rest of the field. Loudon Wainwright continued to explore a rich vein or two. And so, let it be said, has Rufus!

In terms of youth we have any number of very good bands. I would include Coldplay, Radiohead and Muse at the head of an illustrious list (and I'm not up with them all).

Also, during the nineties we have seen the emergence of a great talent, David Hughes.

You can all fill me in on the rest...
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« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2006, 06:27:14 PM »


The whole re-emergence of 'real' country music of whom Steve Erale is certainly a shining star

He's a bit like Steve Earle but dyslexic, he wrote 'My old friend the lubes"  Grin Embarrassed Roll Eyes
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« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2006, 07:03:28 PM »

Looking at what's been "worth listening to" Since 1977 is fairly easy: it gives us the whole of post-punk and new wave to talk about (Blondie, Elvis Costello & The Attractions, Ian Dury, Talking Heads, etc all reached their peak at this time) Then we can go over the re-emergence of Ska (Madness, The Specials & their offshoots), the re-emergence of Prog (Marillion, Peter Gabriel getting fancy videos, etc) and big chunks of heavy metal (Iron Maiden were influential, discuss...) and that only takes us up to the mid eighties.

One accusation that is levelled at modern music is that it is derivative of sounds developed in the 60s. To answer that I'd like to mention two groups who I think are the best of their eras and whose sound was uniquely defined by them :

The first is the Cocteau Twins, the band who epitomise the word 'Ethereal'. Formed in the early eighties and at their peak in the early nineties. Their sound is instantly identifiable and absolutely unique. Liz Frazier has arguably the finest voice of her generation and Robin Guthrie and Simon Raymonde pushed the boundaries of music as landscape further than anyone before.

The second is Banco de Gaia. Essentially one guy, Toby Marks. Banco came out of the Acid House/Techno scene in about 1992, then veered sharply away from that sound to produce a fascinating blend of danceable world music. Influenced less by other musical styles and more by the social political situation in Nepal, Last Train to Lhasa sits easily and permanently in my top ten albums list.

So, there are my two for starters. Not influenced by or derivative of previous genres. Not folk either for that matter so not influenced by 'the tradition'.

Cheers

Nick
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« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2006, 07:57:03 PM »

most of the above i will agree wholeheartedly with esp 2 tone/madness, and the blossomimg of Bruce Springsteen as THE rock god
 the liverpool scene of the early 80's that spawned the bunnymen and st julian and countless other bands , but forgive me if somebody has already mentioned it but i didnt notice the manchester/madchester scene from buzzcocks onwards , joy division, duritti column, new order, the smiths, james,  the stone roses inspiral carpets, oasis, the happy mondays, the charlatans and many more who i will kick myself for leaving, out, up to my lot the hems and loads of other young bands and musicians who are at the bottom of rock/pops ladder at the moment.
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« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2006, 08:13:01 PM »

Ohmigod, to answer this question fully would take up about three pages, so I'm just not going to try. I expect it's all to do with when you were born. I'm a 1964 baby, so I'm terribly excited about all manner of things from 1977 - 1995 and some other stuff beyond. I can't do it, I'll explode.
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« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2006, 09:59:09 PM »

1976 - rock music had become bloated, egotistical twaddle. Pop was was for the teenies. We were ready for something new.

May 13th 1977 - my first punk gig. Slaughter and the Dogs and The Buzzcocks supporting Johnny Thunders Heartbreakers at Parr Hall Warrington. Terrifying but exciting (the Nosebleeds became a bit too much of a reality in the bar). The start of a whole new musical genre to love. It was not all good, but good things came out of it and grew.

The Clash, The Jam, Joy Division, Echo and the Bunnymen.

 From the US we had the likes of Talking Heads, Tom Petty, The Ramones.

Two Tone and ska.

Punk died at the boys got fat. The eighties gave us the 'New Romantics'. I had to leave the country before I was sick.

Still, there came Run DMC with White Lines. Frankie Goes to Hollywood told us to Relax. The establishment was  shocked again.

Factory Records. The Manchester bands - New Order, Happy Mondays.

Folk Punk - the Levellers, the Pogues, the Men They Couldn't Hang

1990s DJs - Fat Boy Slim, the Chemical Brothers, and bands the Orb, REM

and in a catgory by herself - Kirsty McColl

So OK there has been a h*** of a  lot of  dross since 1977, but was a lot before that as well.

Sandra

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« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2006, 10:26:05 PM »

I thought he was just talking about Fc. But music keeps morphing as time goes by. Here is some of my post 1977 cds.

Judas Priest preist in the east
King Crimson Discipline
Tool aeneima
The bones of all men
Pink Floyd the wall
Talking heads
Metallica
Iron Maiden
Thin Lizzy live and dangerous
Ac dc highway to hell
Ramones
Rush
Jethro Tull  (some of the 80's stuff is good)
Idiot Flesh
SGM
The police
Black Sabbath heaven and hell
Dead Kennedy's
Melvins
Old Van Hallen ( I beleive they started in 77 ) (most also mention that I think Eddy eventually killed the guitar solo)
Angelwitch
Yes talk
Charming hostess
uze jdma dome
Stan Rogers fogerty's cove
Faun Fables


and so much more. I think musicians are like magpies. They take a little from here and a little from there. I love hearing new combinations. Punky klezmer, acoustic punk, performance art rock bands, math rock, alt country, costumed bands, one man bands with amazing technology ( captured by robots) . I like so much music. I just can't get into rap. But everything else is possible. I am listening to a cd from iraq right now. I listen to everything from abba to zappa with lots of celtic and classical thrown in.  Music will keep evolving. And some bands will go back to basics. It keeps things interresting. In the 70's, music was largely purchased in record stores. Stoes placed things by category and hard to catagory things were often not stocked or hard to find. There is so much more music available to us now. I say take advatage of these wonderful times. Try something new. Take off the blinders. Support your local bands. Try to find a new good band a month. I listen to a lot of internet radio to find new bands. I find it a joy. I can't even imagine putting a year or limit on what I listen too. My two cents.
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« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2006, 10:32:59 PM »

1976 - rock music had become bloated, egotistical twaddle. Pop was was for the teenies. We were ready for something new.
Still, there came Run DMC with White Lines.  

Ahem....that was Grandmaster Flash. And whatever rose-tinted glasses you're wearing, the biggest selling albums were still Grease and Saturday Night Fever and Frampton Comes Alive, and probably the soundtrack to Abba - The Movie. We might have been ready for something new, Joe public wasn't. Since you ask, I was listening to Neil Young and The Eagles at the time so I'm hardly qualified to comment as a participant. Still, the seeds of rebellion were there - 'New Rose', 'Anarchy', 'Car Wash', 'Hotel California', 'Disco Duck', 'Don't Fear The Reaper'.... Wink.
The eighties, on the other hand? Glorious decade! REM, The Smiths, Green on Red, Prince, U2, Christopher Cross....oh, hang on....
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« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2006, 10:47:04 PM »

I think there is a degree of "nostalgia ain't what it used to be here".

There has always been **** music, but as time passes, we filter out the **** music, and remember the good stuff.

There has been loads of good music since 1977. Madness has been mentioned several times. Stranglers, Clash, Jam. Going a bit more highbrow, Karl Jenkins, The Armed Man. Muse are one of the best hopes for being remembered at the moment, they combine talent with music people want to listen to. The Zutons sound good.

I'll think of loads more later.

Paul
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« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2006, 10:50:58 PM »

The Smiths, Massive Attack, REM, Radiohead and quite a few more.
All good stuff, but I don't see the great leap forward. Even the shouty stuff (Blink 182) that children hope would appall their parents, is just metal meets punk.
Surely the test is, would anything recent have sounded truly alien in 1977?

Or the other way around.
Example David Bowie 'Low'. If it was released today I'm not sure that it would sound dated. Now pick an album from 1948 that wouldn't sound dated in 1977.
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« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2006, 11:11:41 PM »

Ahem....that was Grandmaster Flash. And whatever rose-tinted glasses you're wearing, the biggest selling albums were still Grease and Saturday Night Fever and Frampton Comes Alive, and probably the soundtrack to Abba - The Movie. We might have been ready for something new, Joe public wasn't. Since you ask, I was listening to Neil Young and The Eagles at the time so I'm hardly qualified to comment as a participant. Still, the seeds of rebellion were there - 'New Rose', 'Anarchy', 'Car Wash', 'Hotel California', 'Disco Duck', 'Don't Fear The Reaper'.... Wink.
The eighties, on the other hand? Glorious decade! REM, The Smiths, Green on Red, Prince, U2, Christopher Cross....oh, hang on....

Apologies.

My rose tinted glasses usually had something in the bottom of them (preferably vodka), so my memory is, and judgement may be a little suspect, but I still remember the very late seventies / very early eighties as a very exciting time musically, for me at least.

I was still listening to the Eagles, Neil Young and a lot of other similar bands, but to me the outpourings of what were once great bands in the early seventies had, in many cases, lost more than their sparkle by the the late seventies. I simply stopped going to gigs and buying albums and listened to what I had at home. To be honest, I thought it was just comfortable late twenties settling in and that my gigging days were over.

But then Punk really did reawaken my, and a lot of my friends, interest in going out to see live music again, And that had to be a good thing, because without something to turn the tide a lot of small venues would have died in the land of stadium rock. In my experience people were going out and listening to these new punk bands, and, by the end of the 70s, in not  inconsequential numbers either.

I accept that the likes of Grease, Saturday Night Fever, Abba were huge sellers, and probably still are, but, as I said, there has always been 'popular' music about (and I am not against a bit of Abba myself I might add, at the right time in the right place).

  
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« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2006, 09:31:58 AM »

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« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2006, 09:55:41 AM »

U2 - and before you lot all piss yourselves laughing, they weren't bloated establishment darlings in 1980 when Boy came out. And boy, was it a self assured and somewhat different sound and debut...........

Bjork - nothing like her prior to 77

Cocteau Twins - ethereal bliss

Prefab Sprout - stop laughing at the back - Paddy McAloon has written some of the best songs ever - and it takes a lot to make this old rocker listen to soft melodies.............

The coming of age of reggae and the marriage with Western influences - thank you Black Uhuru (a quick nod to Madness, Specials and the Police, and whatever happened to the Slits?)

Then it all went wrong again.......................

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« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2006, 11:10:05 AM »

Surely the test is, would anything recent have sounded truly alien in 1977?

Yes, that's why I singled out Banco de Gaia. They could not have existed in 1977, or if they had they would have appeared truly alien. The closest connection Banco might have to that era would have been Kraftwerk, but Kraftwerk were not dance-orientated and had no world music element so that comparison alone is not adequate.

On that subject, World Music as a genre or concept didn't exist in 1977 as far as the UK music scene was concerned. The furthest that popular music reached outside of the UK and USA at that time was to Reggae. The Sitar was about as far as the '67 generation of bands reached in terms of world music and that had been rejected as an outmoded hippy thing by 1977.

So there's a reasonable argument that recent sounds that incorporate world music would have appeared alien in '77 and '67.

Two more nominations for recent bands of calibre who don't hark back to the '60s: Massive Attack and LeftField.

Cheers

Nick
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« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2006, 11:23:25 AM »

Leftfield. I like them!
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« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2006, 01:33:28 PM »

The NWOBHM in the late '70s
The prog-rock revival (Marillion, IQ, Twelfth Night, Pallas etc.) early '80s
Discovered folk/folk-rock in a field in Oxfordshire in August 1993.  Grin

There is undoubtedly loads more to add, but these are the probably the most influential to me.

Short and sweet!
Dunc
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